Category Archives: Pictures

cabinet-wall

cabinet-wall
cabinet wall photo

Image by ooh_food

Bathroom

Bathroom
Bathroom photo

Image by plums_deify
The bathroom also carries a number of aspects from the original set; toilet, shower, etc.

Fuzzy yellow thing from Belleville, I’m sure. Instruments from BrickForge.

Olivia’s House 2.0 is inspired by the Olivia’s House in the first wave of the Friend’s line. You’ll see bits and pieces of borrowed from the original set as a bit of a homage. This house, just like the Friend’s house, is designed to come apart, room by room, with all of the furniture and bits removable.

I began building this in January 2012, and the last BL order to finish arrived yesterday. So January to September to get this built.

Paris – Latin Quarter: Église Saint-Séverin – clerestory stained glass

Paris – Latin Quarter: Église Saint-Séverin – clerestory stained glass
Paris   Latin Quarter: Église Saint Séverin   clerestory stained glass photo

Image by wallyg
Église Saint-Séverin (Church of Saint Severin) is dedicated to Séverin, a hermit monk who lived and worshipped on this spot on the Left Bank at the end of the fifth century. After his death, a small basilica was constructed over his tomb, but eventually destroyed by the Vikings. In the 11th century, a Romanesque church was built on the site but by 1200 the small edifice was no longer adequate for the expanding neighborhood.

The new Gothic structure was erected at the beginning of the 13th century, consisting of a central nave accompanied by an aisle on both the north and south sides. By the end of that century, the burgeoning university nearby necessiated further expansion, and in the early 14th century a second aisle was added on the south side of the church.

During the Hundred Years War and under the English occupation in 1448, a massive fire destroyed three quarters of the structure. In 1452 the archpriest of Saint Séverin Guillaume d’Estouteville, later archbishop of Rouen, undertook rebuilding of the church in the stunning late Gothic flamboyant style, with the addition of a new side aisle on the north. In 1489, the church was lengthened toward the east, and a semi-circular apse now replaced the earlier flat end wall, featuring a double ambulatory marked by the striking progression of columns that culminates in a mysteriously coiled central shaft. At the beginning of the 16th century construction began on the chapels along the outer aisles, once more expanding the size of building to provide additional space. By 1520 this work was completed and Saint Séverin assumed the basic appearance it enjoys today.

A second sacristy was constructed in 1643, and in 1673 the royal architect Jules Hardouin-Mansart built the Communion chapel on the southeast outside corner of the church. In 1684 Charles le Brun, decorator of Versailles, undertook modifications in the interior design of the choir, tearing down the rood screen that then separated choir from nave and making other decorative changes, such as marble facing added to the apse columns. This work was financed by Mademoiselle de Montpensier, cousin of the king and member of the Saint Séverin parish. In the 18th century the blind triforium encircling the nave was punched open to be filled with glass, admitting ever more light into the interior.

Until 1790 Saint-Séverin was the seat of the southern archdeaconry of the pre-revolutionary diocese of Paris. During the Revolutionary period the Church was closed to worship, the noble structure assigned to store gunpowder and animal feed. Under Napoleon, as anti-religious restrictions were reversed, the church reopened in 1802.

Both lateral facades of the church are richly decorated with pinnacles, gargoyles and flying buttresses. The west entrance façade is dominated by an expansive flamboyant rose window. The soaring bell tower dates from the first Gothic construction in the early 1200′s; the oldest bell was cast in 1421. The large Gothic portal on the north façade under the bell tower, showing a relief of St. Martin dividing his cloak, was transferred here in the mid-19th century from the church of St-Pierre-aux-boeufs on the Ile de la Cité when it was demolished.

Internal highlights include a set of seven modern windows by Jean René Bazaine, inspired by the seven sacraments of the Catholic church; a deambulatory composed of 10 double spans of pillar-palm trees; ; the oldest triforium in Paris; and one of the oldest organs in Paris, dating to 1745.

The upper windows around the church were created from the late 14th to the 15th century, and they allow sunlight to illuminate the church vividly throughout the day. The windows nearest the entrance, to right and left, are the oldest, along with the central choir windows.

In the triforium level below, 19th century windows in the choir describe scenes from the life of Christ, while those of the north nave depict saints. Figurative windows in the side chapels of the nave likewise date from the 19th century

living room

living room
living room photo

Image by Midtown Crossing at Turner Park

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100407231621_343
100407231621 343 photo

Image by Thikrie, Indian Mirror Mosaic Art ( Mirror Palace)

Handpainted Housekeeper’s Cupboard

Handpainted Housekeeper’s Cupboard
Handpainted Housekeepers Cupboard photo

Image by ChalonHandmade

yellow chairs

yellow chairs
yellow chairs photo

Image by ooh_food